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Showing posts from 2021

Olympic Equality on Full Display in the Pool

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For the first time ever, the Olympic games held a mixed 4x100m relay medley in the pool. This meant that each team had to race two men and two women. They were permitted to align the swimmers in whatever order they chose, based on individual strengths and overall strategy. How interesting. In a sense, you would see the best male swimmers versus the best female swimmers, head to head at various points. The race began, and immediately the countries that started with men raced out to an early lead. The lead was not shocking, but it certainly was not flattering. The men simply powered through the water like sharks. The women, no doubt world class athletes, seemed like Sunday drivers in comparison. In the end, the race evened out, and Great Britain won the gold. It was... entertaining... to say the least. Though somewhat amused, I was also slightly taken aback. Why would the Olympics do this? Why would they showcase just how much faster and stronger the men were? Wasn't that embarrassin

Mass Insanity and the Dog Days of Summer

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Packing camping supplies seems surreal after a year-and-a-half of COVID insanity. Is it still possible to take a family trip to the mountains in 2021? I thought faithful Catholics were facing persecution and martyrdom at every turn. Not yet anyway. As I hauled up the tent and sleeping bags for our vacation, my wife innocently commented, “I hope the Church doesn’t fall apart like during the last trip we took.” She needs to stop saying such things. During the last family trip, the ex-Cardinal McCarrick scandal blew up. We came home to a Church shaken, battered, and not to be trusted (I speak mainly, though not exclusively, of the hierarchy). But it was for the best. Now what on earth could go wrong this trip? The trip itself was invigorating. If the good Lord has created a more stunning place on earth than the Rocky Mountains, I am not aware of it. However, it seems that other Canadians needed to get out of their homes and visit these mountains as well. Campsites and attractions

"Where's My Combat Rosary!?!"

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It is our first full day on our family vacation. After being imprisoned far too long in our little area due to COVID regulations, we are bursting at the seems to traverse and climb the Rocky Mountains. But first, a night in Drumheller, Alberta. The scenery is stunning, yet we are perhaps too excited to see the mountains to give Drumheller its due respects. Also of note, we are a little rusty at camping. It's been a few years since we went on a major trip. This being the first full day, we are disheveled already, and misplacing items left and right. Never mind. It is morning, and before we pack up the campsite I decide to go for a quick jog. I take out my combat rosary , place it on the picnic table at our site, and head out for some exercise throughout the stunning landscape. What a beautiful place. Alas, I return, and our packing up begins in haste. Soon enough we head into the van, eager to hit the highway. Suddenly I slam on the brakes! "Where's my combat rosary!?!"

Millette Family Vacation 2021 - Two Videos

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We just returned from a vacation to the Rocky Mountains. If you wish to tag alongside and see what it was like, check out these two videos!

A Catholic Fairy Tale of Sorts

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“Mr. Millette, can you please tell us a story?” asked the students of a grade five class. “You’re just trying to get out of work. Besides, I can’t just think up a story on the spot.” “But you’re so smart!” came the shameless reply. It is alarming how students these days actually think flattery will get them what they want in life. “Oh stop it!” blushed Mr. Millette. “Yeah, I guess I could try... * * * There was once a cheerful grade five class. The teacher loved his students, and his students loved their teacher. Sure, there were problems in the classroom, some of them rather serious, but there was also a sense of hope and belonging. The classroom was a refuge for all, and it was cherished as such. One day the beloved teacher suddenly announced to his class: “I quit. I will no longer be acting as your teacher. Instead I will stay in my tiny office room at the back of the class. From there I will think about you frequently, and might even poke my head out once in a while. I think this

Tube-Tipping at the West Edmonton Mall - Danny Story (Episode 5)

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My little girl asked for me to make a book about Danny stories -  real accounts of young Danny and his many childhood adventures. "Can you tell us a Danny story?" asks my little girl. I oblige. "Danny was a good little boy, and always very... holy. Except when he wasn't..." * * * Every now and then for a summer vacation our family would wind up at the West Edmonton Mall. Actually, the truth is that I would talk non-stop about the Mall until finally, just to shut me up, we would take the trip. Why the West Edmonton Mall? The pool, darn it! I loved that pool. I still love that pool. I used to dream that heaven was going to be having your own hotel room with a waterslide that goes directly to the West Edmonton Mall waterpark. Maybe it will be.  On one particular trip I was out in the wave pool with some sibling. The waves were crashing over our heads. So too swimmers on tubes. These folks came crashing with the waves, limbs flailing every which way. It is rather da

A (COVID) School Year in Review

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  I have just bid farewell to a year of teaching which I shall never forget.  After the disastrous - one might argue criminal - end to the 2019-2020 school year, this latest academic year was approached with great trepidation amongst parents, students, and teachers alike. It was to be a year of unknowns, built upon invented and ever-changing COVID regulations, with the end game of... I'm not sure. Survival? Control? Student-wellbeing? Two of these three, I imagine. Initially, students were very grateful to return. They worked hard too, which was good because many had forgotten basic addition/subtraction (grade 5) due to the 6-month COVId lay-off. The day-to-day wearing of masks was a nightmare. I had many sore throats, as did the students. Overall, however, it was great to be back. The year progressed, so too the regulations. Masks became required in Phys Ed, on the playground, and while playing sports in town. Then by November we were told to stay away from sports (in town), as we

"Why Are We Eating Hotdogs Today?" - Danny Story (Episode 4)

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My little girl asked for me to make a book about Danny stories -  real accounts of young Danny and his many childhood adventures. "Oh boy!" I shouted with far too much enthusiasm. "It's the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus! Do you know what that means?" My children paused and thought.... "We're going to pray the litany?" "No! I mean, yes... but it means we're going to eat hotdogs! What a time to be alive!" "But... why dad?" asked my little girl.  Thus began yet another Danny story. * * * Danny was a good little boy, and always very... hungry. When Danny was in grade one he went to a nice school called Scotsburn. Now little Danny didn't know if the name was to hon our the Scots, or be racist towards them. Regardless, Scotsburn had an honorable tradition built on organically-developed cultural awareness. That is, every Friday they had a hotdog sale. This meant the teacher would take orders, and kids would shell out their

The "Legacy" of Biden's Bishops

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I am thinking about a famous scene in the life of St. Jean-Marie Vianney. He is twenty, and attempting to study for the priesthood. “Attempting” is perhaps too kind of a word. It is an utter debacle. As the language of Latin killed the Romans - the saying goes - it is now killing him. In this scene Jean-Marie is being reprimanded by a much younger Mathias Loras, a bright but excitable student of only twelve. Though himself excitable, Jean-Marie does what only a saint would do, and kneels down before the young boy and asks for forgiveness. Mathias bursts into tears at the sight of Jean-Marie’s humility, and throws himself into the arms of our good saint. At that moment a friendship begins.  We know the future of Jean-Marie, later titled the Curé of Ars. But what of young Mathias Loras? According to Abb é Francis Trochu’s biography, The Curé of Ars , Mathias went on to become a missionary in the United States, and was even made the first bishop of Dubuque, Iowa (p.40). It is said that th